ASIA CLEAN ENERGY SUMMIT 2020

Conference and Exhibition
27 - 29 October 2020
Marina Bay Sands, Singapore

Session Synopsis

View synopsis by session:

Clean Energy Leaders Dialogue

Energy & Power Leaders on the Fuel Mix
As the global economy slumps under the weight of the coronavirus pandemic, falling electricity demand is increasing financial pressure on fossil fuel plants and creating an opportunity for renewable energy resources to grab a bigger share of the market. Some consider that the pandemic could put another nail in the coffin for coal demand from the utility sector and undermine the position of gas.  We ask ASEAN energy and power CEOs their views on building sustainable clean energy baseload strategies and how COVID has impacted business.

27 October 2020, Tuesday
9.00AM - 9.05AM
  • WELCOME ADDRESS

    • Edwin Khew, Chairman, Sustainable Energy Association of Singapore
9.05AM - 9.10AM
  • KEYNOTE: Singapore's Clean Energy Ambitions

9.10AM - 9.25AM
  • Keynote: Using the COVID Crisis to Transform the ASEAN Energy System

9.25AM - 9.50AM
  • KEYNOTE: Evolving the Grid to Tap the ASEAN Renewable Power Opportunity

9.50AM - 10.30AM
  • OPENING OF EXHIBITION / Morning Break

10.30AM - 10.45AM
  • KEYNOTE: Grid Balancing Challenges - Securing Expansion of Renewable Energy Resources

10.45AM - 11.30AM
  • PANEL: Regional Power CEOs on Building Sustainable Power Infrastructure

    As economies gradually feel their way to the “next normal” that is emerging from the COVID-19 pandemic, ASEAN utilities may need to recalibrate the speed and scope of ongoing efforts to curb climate change. How far and fast they go will depend both on the rate at which the economics of renewables improve and on the advancement of new technologies

11.30AM - 12.15PM
  • PANEL: Preparing for Mass Electrification and the Big Switch Strategy

    Today, 95% of Singapore's electricity is generated using natural gas. While gas will continue to be a fuel for Singapore in the near future, the government recently announced a Net Zero Emission 2050 ambition and has listed four switch pathways for Singapore’s energy transition. How will the Big Switch and Mass Electrification impact power stakeholders?

12.15PM - 1.45PM
  • Lunch Break

1.45PM - 2.00PM
  • Developing Integration Partnerships with Grid Operators

    • Frank Phuan, Founder and CEO, Sunseap, Singapore 
2.00PM - 2.15PM
  • Feasibility & Development of Utility Scale Solar Power Projects

2.15PM - 3.00PM
  • PANEL: Comparing Pathways to the Big Switch – Investments Beyond Fossil Fuels

    Investors and governments are putting pressure on the fossil fuel industry to support a transition to clean energy. Energy and power companies are responding with new investments in renewables and clean power infrastructure. Their approaches to the energy transition challenges are very different.

3.00PM - 3.30PM
  • Afternoon Break

3.30PM - 3.45PM
  • The Post-Covid Green Recovery in the Clean Energy Sector

    • Jon Moore, CEO, BNEF, UK
3.45PM - 4.30PM
  • PANEL: Will Utilities Survive the Shift to Decentralised Renewable Power?

    As national utilities chart their course through the energy transition facing rapid change and disruption, they are beginning the transformation into integrated power business. Will utilities be able to pivot quickly enough to meet the needs of the energy transition or will international IPPs and Renewable Developers beat them to it?

4.30PM - 5.15PM
  • PANEL: Transformation of Conventional Electricity Generation Towards a Flexible, Reliable Low-Carbon Emitting System

    ASEAN has set an ambitious target of securing 23 percent of its primary energy from renewable sources by 2025 as energy demand in the region is expected to grow by 50 percent. Switching out of coal requires massive transition investment. Collaboration between the public and private sector is necessary to bridge and meet the challenges at hand.

5.15PM
  • End of Day 1 / Please join us for SIEW Cocktails


Clean Energy Financial Summit

Building 100% Renewable Energy Systems
Global progress towards achieving a 100% renewable energy future is being made at an incredibly rapid pace. Power providers, utilities and governments are changing their perspectives towards inflexible generation and existing thermal capacity is being replaced with renewables. What are the challenges and opportunities to shifting to a carbon free power system? And where will the investment required to shift the energy system come from? This session brings together all the stakeholders to debate and envision what this future holds for both the supply and demand side of the capital.

28 OCTOBER 2020, WEDNESDAY
9.00AM - 9.05AM
  • WELCOME ADDRESS

9.05AM - 9.25AM
  • OPENING KEYNOTE

    • Ali Izadi, Head of Asia Pacific Research, BNEF, Korea
9.25AM - 10.10AM
  • PANEL: Risks and Returns from the Energy Transition

    Carbon emissions were once thought of as a costless “externality” by business. But as evidence of climate change has mounted and public opinion shifted, energy companies have begun to look at the real financial consequences. Financial Managers have traditionally been in the background of energy transition discussions. This is beginning to change.

10.10AM - 10.40AM
  • Morning Break

10.40AM - 11.00AM
  • Australian Renewable Energy Investment Landscape

11.00AM - 11.50PM
  • PANEL: Where is the ASEAN Green New Deal?

    Europe has raised targets for renewables and energy efficiency as part of its Green Deal strategy to zero-out greenhouse gases by the middle of the century. Where do ASEAN countries stand on green deals? Can focusing on clean energy help the wider markets? Is building a path to towards 100 Percent renewable energy economically sound?

11.50AM - 12.30PM
  • PANEL: Building Bankable Clean Energy Projects

    Renewable energy project deployments are gaining market acceleration. Renewable technology share in the global energy mix is still dependent on financial support that encourages project deployments. How can renewable energy projects be structured so that they are more bankable?

12.30PM - 1.30PM
  • Lunch Break

1.30PM - 2.20PM
  • PANEL: The Role of Incumbent Energy Companies in the Energy Transition

    The changing pattern of world energy industry, with increasing demand for renewable energy projects, opens a new market for the traditional oil & gas EPC contractors. Stand-alone renewable energy projects or integrated with new or old oil & gas facilities are new opportunities for the EPC sector.  

2.20PM - 3.00PM
  • PANEL: Common Challenges - Cooperative Solutions: Lessons from Nordic Regional Energy System Cooperation

    As countries in South-East Asia are recognizing the dilemma of increased energy demand and need for decarbonization, regional cooperation within energy and climate gas emission handling is getting ever more urgent. The Nordic region has developed and deployed smart and green city solutions and policies for decades. Experienced in cross-border grid collaboration, the Nordic countries also work together to improve energy security and provide excellent electricity market design and regulatory frameworks. Join us for a dialogue on how Nordic experiences in regional energy collaboration can support addressing challenges in South East Asia through an exchange of ideas and concepts, technologies, and policies.

     

    • Moderator: Dr. Per Christer Lund, Counsellor, Innovation Norway/Royal Norwegian Embassy
    • Hans-Arild Bredesen, CEO, Nordpool Consulting, Norway
3.00PM - 3.30PM
  • Afternoon Break

3.30PM - 4.30PM
  • PANEL:  You Think 2050 Targets Are Too Distant? How Can We Achieve Net Zero Carbon Power Today?

    Solar and wind energy hold the largest potential across renewable technologies. Hydrogen, carbon capture, storage & utilisation (CCSU) technologies may also contribute to helping nations achieve Net Zero Emission targets. How are these technologies being used today to help the power sector and industrial customers meet their sustainable energy goals?

     

    • Loïc Villocel, Director, ENGIE Lab, Singapore
    • Dr. Aaron Hoskin, Chief Advisor for Transportation and Alternate Fuels, Natural Resources Canada, Canada
4.30PM - 5.30PM
  • PANEL: Financing the Energy Transition: Where’s the Money?

    Funding the energy transition will require trillions of dollars. Where will the investment required to shift the energy system come from? What role will capital markets, multilateral funds and private investors play? How can barriers to funding the energy transition be lowered?

     

    • Moderator: David Kang, Senior Associate, BNEF, Japan

Virtual Workshop on Clean Cooling Solutions for Asia and the Pacific Region

Jointly organized by: Asian Development Bank (ADB) and Sustainable Energy Association of Singapore (SEAS)

In a warming world, demand for cooling is rising, and with it the risks for vulnerable populations who are unable to access it today. As the global community works to deliver sustainable energy for all, access to cooling has emerged as a modern energy service that is necessary to reduce energy poverty gaps and inequalities. Rather than being a luxury, access to sustainable cooling is vital to health and livelihoods, and a low-carbon future.

The Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic underscored what has been known all along, that ensuring access to affordable, reliable, sustainable, and modern energy for all (SDG 7) is intertwined with the other Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), in this case, good health and well-being (SDG 3) and climate action (SDG 13). Access to clean cooling, which is one of the modern energy services, reduces inequalities across human comfort and safety, and is essential to health services, and agricultural and food needs as well as to mitigate and combat climate change and its impacts.

Based on a 2019 report of Sustainable Energy for All, 1.1 billion people globally, of which 614.8 million live in Asia, are facing high risks due to lack of access to cooling for basic needs.[1] The shortage of affordable and sustainable cooling solutions negatively impact access to health essentials, and the ability to find respite from dangerously high temperatures. Clean cooling solutions are important in storing and transporting perishable goods, such as food and medicines. With the advent of vaccines that will stamp out COVID-19 and other diseases, clean cooling will play a key role in ensuring universal access to health; cooling will be critical for the effective distribution of the vaccines to billions of people.[2] For those living in hot climates, access to clean cooling has become a necessity to avoid serious risks to their health, and sustain their well-being and productivity.

Ensuring the availability of cooling that is affordable, sustainable, and accessible to all who need it is essential to alleviating poverty and achieving the global sustainable development goals (SDGs) by 2030. The ADB has provided more than 100 million people with modern access to electricity through its Energy for All Initiative. Now, ADB, in partnership with the Sustainable Energy Association of Singapore, through its Sustainable Energy Centre of Excellence (SECOE), is channeling its efforts toward bridging the energy access gaps in clean and sustainable cooling.


[1] Sustainable Energy for All. 2019. Chilling Prospects: Tracking Sustainable Cooling for All. (Link).

[2] UN Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (UNESCAP). 2020. Policy Briefs in Support of the High-Level Political Forum 2020: Accelerating SDG7 Achievement in the Time of COVID-19. (Link).

28 October 2020
14:00 - 14:05
  • Opening Remarks

14:05 - 14:10
  • Session 1: Clean Cooling Situation in the Asia and Pacific Region and the Role of the Government

    Clean cooling has emerged as a necessary modern energy service to reduce poverty gaps and inequalities; it is vital to health and livelihood, and has become an important element to a low-carbon future. Since developments in cooling are relatively new compared with other modern energy services such as access to electricity, government plays a key role in ensuring access to clean cooling solutions is affordable, equitable, and timely.

     

    This session describes the cooling scenario in the Asia Pacific region in light of the Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 7. It presents the status, issues, and prospects, and establishes the importance of clean cooling solutions. The presentations will include discussions on product availability, choices, and affordability; and lack of appropriate policies, non-inclusion of clean cooling solutions in energy master plans, and information gaps and awareness building.

     

    This session also discusses the role of the government in encouraging the uptake of clean cooling solutions through policies, subsidies, and incentives; and instituting standards and regulations. Discussions will include the institutional structure or framework that is responsible for promoting wider access to clean cooling solutions; and challenges governments encountered, their responses, and the ensuing outcomes in providing clean cooling solutions.

14:10 - 14:20
  • Current Status, and Impediments in Achieving SDG 7 in Terms of Access to Clean Cooling in the Region

14:20 - 14:30
  • The Role of the Government in the Provision of Clean Cooling Solutions - Country Case

14:30 - 14:40
  • Q&A Session

14:40 - 14:45
  • Session 2: Innovative Technologies for Clean Cooling Solutions
    This session discusses innovative technologies in clean cooling—for health, agriculture, perishables, livelihood—that are applicable to the developing countries of the Asia Pacific region. Some of these technologies are solar-powered storage, solar-powered containers, and ground or waste water used for cooling. The discussion includes issues and challenges in adopting the technologies, and recommendations in replicating and scaling-up access to them in the developing countries of the region. 

14:45 - 14:55
  • Innovative Technologies that are Applicable to the Asia and Pacific Developing Countries - Case #1

14:55 - 15:05
  • Innovative Technologies that are Applicable to the Asia and Pacific Developing Countries - Case #2

15:05 - 15:15
  • Q&A Session

15:15 - 15:20
  • BREAK

15:20 - 15:25
  • Session 3: Business Models for Clean Cooling Solutions
    This session presents the available business models in clean cooling that are applicable to the developing countries of the Asia Pacific region. It discusses how clean cooling solutions could be financed, replicated, and scaled up, and how they will be set-up, operated, and maintained. It presents ways to increase financial commitments to facilitate access to cooling. Collaboration among government, non-government organizations, financial intermediaries, private sector, and communities could make the provision of clean cooling more efficient and effective. 

15:25 - 15:35
  • Business Model for Clean Cooling Solutions - Case #1

15:35 - 15:45
  • Business Model for Clean Cooling Solutions - Case #2

15:45 - 15:55
  • Q&A Session

15:55 - 16:00
  • Closing Remarks


Virtual Workshop on Access to Clean Cooking in Asia and the Pacific

Jointly organized by:  Asian Development Bank (ADB) and Sustainable Energy Association of Singapore (SEAS)

Around 1.8 billion people or nearly 40% of the Asia-Pacific region’s population in 2018 rely on polluting and unhealthy cooking fuels and technologies.[1] Close to 4 million people worldwide die prematurely each year from illness attributable to household air pollution from inefficient cooking practices using polluting stoves paired with solid fuels and kerosene.[2] Despite stipulations for universal access to clean cooking by 2030 on the Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 7, the Asia-Pacific has been slow in its journey to achieving this goal.[3]   

Further setbacks in achieving the SDGs have been feared due to the spread of the Coronavirus (COVID-19) this year. But, achieving universal access to clean cooking is a necessary action to achieve not only affordable, reliable, sustainable, and modern energy services for all (SDG 7), but also healthy lives and well-being for all at all ages (SDG 3) and readiness to combat climate change and its impacts (SDG 13). Continuing and accelerating the efforts in the provision of clean cooking, will decrease indoor air pollution, help households avoid respiratory diseases, contribute to allaying the future impacts of natural disasters and calamities, and support in developing the resilience of countries' renewable energy systems.

Provision of clean cooking for the rural and urban-poor population will alleviate the plight of women—who often bear the brunt of household work—and children, who both suffer more from the health consequences of indoor air pollution.[4] Household air pollution is attributable to cooking and heating practices using solid fuel (wood, charcoal, coal, dung, crop wastes) on open fires or traditional stoves. These produce harmful air pollutants such as fine particulates, toxic smoke as well as climate change-inducing gases like black carbon. According the World Health Organization, household air pollution causes noncommunicable diseases such as stroke, ischemic heart disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and lung cancer.[5] As such, access to clean fuels and technologies such as clean cookstoves reduces exposure to indoor air pollutants and health risks including death. 

Recognizing the critical gap between the SDG7 target by 2030 of achieving universal access to clean cooking, and the current low access and slow progress toward the goal, the Asian Development Bank (ADB), in partnership with the Sustainable Energy Association of Singapore (SEAS), through its Sustainable Energy Center of Excellence (SECOE), will undertake a workshop focusing on access to clean cooking. Knowledge gained through this workshop would contribute to closing the disparity in clean energy access among countries in Asia and the Pacific, particularly in the field of cooking.


[1] UN Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (UNESCAP). 2020. Policy Briefs in Support of the High-Level Political Forum 2020: Accelerating SDG7 Achievement in the Time of COVID-19. (Link).

[2] World Health Organization. 2018. Household Air Pollution and Health. 8 May. (Link).

[3] SDG7 is ensuring access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all. Access to modern energy includes: (a) access to electricity and (b) access to clean fuels and technologies for cooking.

[4] UNESCAP. 2017. Inequality of Opportunity in Asia and the Pacific: Clean Energy. (Link).

[5] Footnote 2.

29 October 2020
14:00 - 14:05
  • Opening Remarks

14:05 - 14:20
  • Session 1: Accelerating Access to Clean Cooking in the Asia and Pacific Region: Status and Major Issues
    The presentation will discuss the status of access to clean cooking in the Asia and Pacific region specifically focusing on the  current issues, challenges, and barriers. It will highlight the critical role of clean cooking in  the achievement of the SDGs and its current status in terms of technical, policy, and  financial challenges and risks. Focus will also be placed on the major issues and barriers to increasing access to clean cooking, and promoting the shift from traditional to modern cooking technologies. 

14:20 - 14:30
  • Q&A Session

14:30 - 14:35
  • Session 2: Best Practices on Innovative Clean Cooking Technologies

    Presentations will showcase case studies of innovative clean cooking technologies already being implemented and piloted in the region specifically in areas lacking access to clean cooking and fuel. The case studies will provide a glimpse of the challenges encountered, measures taken, and recommendations moving forward in order to replicate and scale up said technologies and solutions in other parts of the region. Measures taken to tackle indoor air pollution and its impacts on the health and environment will also be discussed.

14:35 - 14:45
  • Best Practices on Innovative Clean Cooking Technologies - Case #1

14:45 - 14:55
  • Best Practices on Innovative Clean Cooking Technologies - Case #2

14:55 - 15:10
  • Q&A Session

15:10 - 15:15
  • BREAK

15:15 - 15:20
  • Session 3: Accelerating Access to Clean Cooking in the Asia and Pacific Region: Solutions and Scaling-up
    The presentations will discuss the different ways and  measures that should be and have already been taken  by the  public and private sectors, including development financing institutions, in increasing financial commitments in clean cooking. To be highlighted are the roles they have played, and the different mechanisms, approaches used, challenges, and lessons learned to encourage financing of sustainable clean cooking solutions.

    Presentation on the critical role of government to promote and achieve access to clean cooking - government program on clean cooking including policy and regulatory standards and framework that are conducive to private sector investment in clean cooking technologies.

15:20 - 15:30
  • Solutions and Scaling-up Access to Clean Cooking - Case #1

15:30 - 15:40
  • Solutions and Scaling-up Access to Clean Cooking - Case #2

15:40 - 15:55
  • Q&A Session

15:55 - 16:00
  • Closing Remarks


International Floating Solar Symposium*

28 to 30 October 2020

*Virtual Event

seris7

As the longest running gathering in the dynamic floating solar sector, the International Floating Solar Symposium (IFSS) will be once again convening global thought leaders for its Fourth Edition. As we try to adapt from the current global health crisis, IFSS will be this year 100% virtual and organized over three days, i.e. October 28, 29 and 30, 2020.

IFSS 2020 will focus on the latest best practices across the world relating to the development and operation of floating solar projects. With a total of 2 GWdc installed by mid-2020‒including almost 95% in Asia, some key areas still require further learning and research, especially across climate zones and types of water surfaces. Whilst leveraging the existing knowledge built up in other offshore industries is taking place, further sharing and optimization is required across geographic zones and companies to provide durable and sustainable solutions for our future generations as they will continue facing astute land, power and resource scarcity.

*Access to this virtual summit is included for all registered ACES delegates

If you would like to register for this virtual summit separately, CLICK HERE to register now.


Nordic Green Conference

Synergies and efficiencies in regional energy collaboration – lessons from the Nordics

*Hybrid Event

Organised By:
Innovation Norway, Business Sweden, Embassy of Finland, Embassy of Denmark, Embassy of Iceland, Nordic Innovation House

As countries in South-East Asia are recognizing the dilemma of increased energy demand and need for decarbonisation, regional cooperation within energy and climate gas emission handling is getting ever more urgent.

The Nordic region has developed and deployed smart and green city solutions and policies for decades. Experienced in cross-border grid collaboration, the Nordic countries also work together to improve energy security and provide excellent electricity market design and regulatory frameworks.

Join us for a dialogue on how Nordic experiences in regional energy collaboration can support addressing challenges in South East Asia through an exchange of ideas and concepts, technologies and policies by companies, research communities and government.

*Note: The Nordic Green Conference is a hybrid event which will take place concurrently onsite at Marina Bay Sands, Singapore and streamed live online for overseas audiences.

29 October 2020
12:00 - 13:00
  • Networking lunch for onsite attendees at Marina Bay Sands
    *limited places only

13:00 - 13:45
  • Welcome and Opening Remarks

    • HE Anita Nergaard, Ambassador of Norway

    Setting the stage for Singapore – National Low-Emission Development Strategy

    • NN, National Climate Change Secretariat, PM Office of Singapore 
13:45 - 15:30
  • Decarbonization – regional coordination and cooperation

    In this track, we address national and regional strategies for lowing carbon footprint in urban regions – experiences from the Nordics in an ASEAN-relevant context. 

     

    Topics:

     

    • Low carbon energy carriers – regional production and exchange of LNG, hydrogen
    • Circular economy – regional aspects for resource efficiency and waste management
    • The carbon cycle – regional cooperation on CCUS: The Northern Lights CCS project
    • Panel discussion – Q&A sessions
15:30 - 16:00
  • COFFEE BREAK

    Connecting Nordic participants by web-conferencing

16:00 - 18:00
  • Electricity system integration

    In this track, we discuss the success of the Nordic electricity system integration, the NordPool cooperation, and discuss prospects for regional electricity market in ASEAN.

     

    Topics:

     

    • General address from Nordic state secretary
    • The Nordic power market Nordpool – relevance for ASEAN
      – Hans-Arild Bredesen, Director, Nordpool Consulting
    • Progress of regional electricity market in ASEAN
       Philip Andrew-Speed, Energy Study Institute, NUS/ASEAN Centre for Energy
    • Complementing national energy mixes – enabler for large deployment of intermittent renewable energy
    • Panel discussion – Q&A sessions
18:00
  • End of Conference

18:15 - 19:30
  • Cocktail Reception at Marina Bay Sands